Monday, September 8, 2014

Can Science Content be Taught in a Video Game?

In this article in Teaching Exceptional Children, Matthew Marino (University of Central

Florida) and four colleagues suggest ways teachers can use video games to teach science

content to secondary students with special needs. Here is their list of free, well-designed

science games:

- Agricultural Simulator (Earth Sciences) – www.agriculturalsimulator.com

- Bridge Project (Engineering and technology) – http://www.bridgeproject-game.com

- Dust (Chemical and physical properties) – http://dan-ball.jp/en/javagame/dust

- Garbage dreams (Earth sciences) – http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/garbage-
dreams/game.html

Marshall Memo 549 August 25, 2014

- The Incredible Machine (Physics) – http://www.freegameempire.com/games/The-
Incredible-Machine

- Orbiter (Space science) - http://orbit.medphys.ucl.ac.uk

- Wolf Quest (Life sciences) – http://www.wolfquest.org

“Enhancing Secondary Science Content Accessibility with Video Games” by Matthew

Marino, Kathleen Becht, Eleazar Vasquez III, Jennifer Gallup, James Basham, and Benjamin

Gallegos in Teaching Exceptional Children, September/October 2014 (Vol. 47, #1, p. 27-34),

http://tcx.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/07/18/0040059914542762.abstract?rss=1; Marino

can be reached at Matthew.marino@ucf.edu.

Back to page one